A Day in the Life, Part 2

This post continues my description in the last one of a day in the life of a medical student on rotation, where I’ve left off at lunchtime of an inpatient service day.

During the afternoon, the work of executing plans continues. If the team discharges a patient, that patient needs a follow-up appointment in clinic to make
sure there are no complications from the hospital visit. We call up the outpatient clinics and schedule patients for their next appointments. In other
cases, we need a patient’s hospital records from his or her previous visit to another hospital. Because electronic health records are usually closed within
a hospital system, we have to request that other hospitals fax us medical information. This is a rate-limiting factor in getting complete access to lab and
imaging results, which are integral to patient care. For instance, if a patient comes in with a severe headache and another hospital performed a CT scan of
his head, access to that scan may be essential to ruling out a diagnosis of something serious, like a brain tumor or infection. And if we can’t get
the images from the other hospital we may have to do one at our hospital. This is, undoubtedly, one of the major weaknesses of a non-universal electronic
health record system.

The medical team may also discharge a patient to a skilled nursing facility (SNF) or an old-age home, in which case the facility needs documentation
regarding what further care is needed. Some patients do not have anywhere to go after the hospital; some abuse alcohol or drugs and must go to a rehab
program; some can’t pay for the oxygen they need at home or medications for HIV; others started taking a blood thinner called warfarin and need to schedule appointments at a lab to get blood levels of this medication checked. To
deal with all this, the residents, attending, pharmacists, nurses, and social workers all coordinate with each other and with governmental and private
organizations to get the patient where he or she needs to be and what he or she needs in order to stay healthy. The healthcare team takes on this Sisyphean
task with varied success. Given the number of factors involved in this transition, one of which is whether the patient takes his or her medication, the
result is not always ideal. I’ll write more about this later.

Additionally, the residents and attending physician sometimes admit new patients to the hospital during the afternoons from smaller hospitals in the
community. Community hospitals are not always capable of caring for patients with a rare tumor or disease, while academic medical centers, which are
attached to medical schools, have more physicians who specialize in and research rare disorders. For example, a patient having seizures that cannot be controlled with first or second-line medications is sent
over to an academic institution where neurologists experienced in handling refractory seizures can care for the patient.

The medical team may also admit a patient from the Emergency Department (ED) for a full diagnostic workup and treatment of an acute or chronic disease. For instance, a patient
with worsening Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) needs temporary
high-potency medications for a few days before going back home. Some patients with an exacerbation of this disease need constant monitoring so they don’t
experience respiratory failure. Clearly, then, the afternoons can get busy, especially if the residents have to finish their notes.

At 6 p.m., the night intern arrives and receives checkout from the day team: The day intern runs through a list with the night intern, describing the new
admissions to the hospital service, the events over the course of the day for each patient, and which lab and imaging results the night intern needs to
follow.

Image via Shutterstock

Outpatient and the ED

The time that we spend in a doctor’s office — on our outpatient weeks — is a lot less hectic. Whether we are in family medicine, pediatrics, or obstetrics/gynecology clinic, we arrive at 8 a.m., which
gives us time to exercise in the morning or stay up a bit later at night. The residents arrive at the same time. We look at the clinic schedule for the
day on the electronic health system and begin to read old notes in the electronic health record to get ourselves up to date with the latest medical information
on each patient.

When patients arrive, the medical student goes in first to interview a patient and do a focused physical exam, after which the student reports his findings and his plan to the resident, just like we do in the ED. The attending and the
resident then see the patient and come up with a tailored plan for how to proceed. We have an hour for lunch at noon and then come back from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. (This is similar to our ED
shifts, since they are both eight hours — except of course our ED shifts are sometimes late at night or overnight, and there are no scheduled meal breaks during an ED shift.)

After our days finish, we are expected to do research on a disease process we saw during the day. If a patient comes in with pneumonia, we read up on the
common causes of pneumonia and the various treatments available for it. We also study for our shelf exam, which is a national multiple-choice test that we must pass
after each third-year rotation. At the end of pediatrics, for instance, the shelf exam tests us on pediatric illnesses and treatments. These tests are difficult
and so we frequently study from various third-party review resources —

Kaplan
, UWorld, PreTest, Case Files, and others. A whole industry is built around these shelf exams, which
eventually culminate in a nine-hour, eight-section national licensing exam called STEP 2 CK. This comprehensive exam
tests basic clinical knowledge at the end of third year. So on a day-to-day basis we not only worry about learning how to deal with patients and their
illnesses but we also study for our exams, which is a requirement that ensures we know the important information involved in our daily practice.

A Day in the Life, Part 1

My editors here at The New Atlantis suggested I write about what a day is like for me and other members of the medical team. What exactly (aside from
rounding) do we do all day? When do we have to be in? When do we leave? What goes on when we’re not rounding?

We can divide the third year of medical school into three distinct categories of rotations. There are inpatient weeks (hospital work), outpatient weeks
(doctor’s office work), and the Emergency Department, or ED. The roles differ as do the schedules. I have already described a bit about how the ED works here. The hospital is for patients who need urgent medical attention or
medical procedures. If a patient is having a heart attack, for instance, a cardiologist in the hospital will make sure the patient does not suffer
complications from the disease process. Outpatient work, by contrast, involves less urgent medical problems, like adjusting blood pressure medications or prescribing antibiotics for an ear infection. Let me take you through a day on inpatient and outpatient medicine.

Inpatient

On an inpatient service the interns arrive at approximately 6 a.m. or, if on a surgical service, at 5:30 a.m., and print out a patient list from the electronic
health record. This list of patients contains the patient names, chief complaints, possible diagnoses, ages, and other basic information of the patients we
need to see. It contains a summary of tests and test results as well. It may seem a bit silly that physicians need a reminder about which patients they are
taking care of; however, the hospital experiences quick turnover. A patient may be present for only a couple of days before leaving. Then, a new patient
with a new history and a new problem takes his or her place. Additionally, when there are sixteen patients on the list it is difficult to keep up with
every story.

Medical students arrive shortly after the interns (the residents are a bit like our supervisors, letting us know when we can leave and when we ought to
come in). Given how early in the day we usually have to be in, there is little time in the morning to do anything but eat a quick breakfast while
bleary-eyed before driving to the hospital in the dark. If we’re there early enough, we receive checkout from the night intern. The night intern goes
through each patient on the list and discusses the latest news on each patient. Did the patient vomit? Did he or she have trouble breathing? What
interventions, tests, or treatments were done? Additionally, if the night intern admitted new patients overnight, what is the story behind the hospital
admission? These questions are vital to the care of each patient. If the day resident does not know, for example, that a patient was having trouble
breathing or received an imaging study then the resident does not know to look at the results of that study, potentially missing a life-threatening problem
like a collapsed lung or a heart attack. In an ideal world, the transition between resident shifts is so seamless that it is as if the day resident took
care of or admitted patients during the night.

Subsequently, the interns assign medical students to “follow” one, two, or three patients (depending on how far along we are during our third year). Following a patient
means knowing the vital signs daily and keeping up with the results of x-rays, CT scans, and lab tests. It also means we come up with a plan for that
patient’s care and propose it to the attending and residents. In truth, the residents and attendings already know what they are going to do for the patient
and our proposals are merely an exercise for our own edification.

After these assignments, we go through the chart on the electronic health record and read about the patient’s history. We read the night intern’s note on
the patient and we look at the labs (tests) that the intern ordered. These notes give us a sense of what the residents or attendings thought the patient had and
needed. For example, if the patient came into the ED with a fever and a cough, the notes will usually mention a workup and treatment for a possible pneumonia, or lung infection (which includes a chest x-ray, sputum culture, and
empiric antibiotics). More importantly, students and residents look at the vital signs of the
patients we follow. These indicate if the patient needs immediate treatment. Is the blood pressure too low with a fast heart rate and a high body
temperature? This indicates a possible blood infection and we take blood cultures and administer antibiotics.

Despite the fact that the sun has not yet peeked through the hospital windows, we subsequently visit patients in their rooms to do a physical exam. We look
at new rashes that patients have, listen to hearts and lungs with stethoscopes and perform neurological exams. We target our exam at the patient’s
presenting illness. For a patient with pneumonia, we listen closely to the patient’s lungs for abnormal breathing sounds due to the infection. All this, of
course, entails waking the patient up. And since residents, appropriately, will come in after us to make sure that we have done the physical exam correctly
and that the patient is in no distress, we unfortunately wake the patient up at least twice during the early morning hours. This is separate from the
instances where the nurses wake the patient up to draw blood for morning labs. Such is one difficulty of being a patient at a teaching hospital, something
I will discuss in future posts.

Image via Shutterstock

Once we’re finished seeing the patients, we have a little bit of time left before rounds start at 8 a.m. We look up information about the illnesses our patients have. We also write down the information we will need to present the patient to the attending physician on rounds. I’ve written a bit about
patient presentations in this post, but in sum,
our presentations report the relevant medical information and treatment plan in an organized and concise matter.

At 8 a.m., the attending arrives and we round on patients. Aside from the few patient presentation(s) we do for the attending we remain silent and watch and
learn as I’ve described previously. Once we finish rounding
we go over the patient list in the physician work room. We make sure that we all agree on the plans for each patient for the rest of the day. Some patients
need to leave the hospital. Some need more IV fluids or medications. And some need an imaging study or a blood test.

After we’ve confirmed all of this, the residents write “notes” about each patient for the electronic health record. A note is similar in format to a patient
presentation. It contains a brief history of the patient’s chief complaint and illness as well as the blood test results, imaging test results, diagnosis,
past medical history, and past surgical history, as well as the treatment plan for the patient. These notes, though incredibly time-consuming, serve a
valuable purpose. First, legally, the note can help protect a physician from future lawsuits. The note documents a physician’s train of thought and
actions. It justifies the tests and treatments which patients receive in the hospital. Second, it is used for billing purposes by documenting what was done
for the patient. And third, when the patient goes for a follow-up appointment with another physician in clinic, the note acts as a standardized form of
communication to update the clinician on what was done in the hospital.

At lunchtime, medical students usually receive a lecture from a physician in the rotation. In pediatrics, for instance, we may listen to a lecture on
pediatric respiratory complaints from a pediatrician. Meanwhile, the residents remain in the workroom or, if they’ve finished with their notes, they can
grab a quick bite to eat in the cafeteria. Sometimes, though, the residents are swamped. They carry around pagers or phones, and nurses and other physicians
page or call throughout the day with questions about specific patients. A patient may get a headache or feel nauseous and the nurse may page the resident
to ask if it’s okay to give pain medication or antiemetics (medication for nausea or vomiting). Given
that there are a limited number of residents, if multiple patients fall extremely ill and need medications, it can be difficult for the residents to
respond to other more minor complaints. A cardiac arrest on the floor, for example, may prevent the resident from ordering pain medication for a patient
with a headache.

More on a day in the life, in a bit…

Residents and Rounds

Doctors practice “grand rounds,” ca. 1920s.
(National Library of Medicine)

This post is meant to provide a bit of background about how the day works and how a medical team functions so the references I make in future posts are clear. Let’s begin with the team. Nearly every medical team at an academic hospital consists of an attending physician, residents, interns, and medical school students. While these terms might sound familiar to anyone who has watched medical dramas on TV, it’s likely that most people don’t know what they mean. The attending physician is a bit like a tenured professor. He or she has the most experience and training in the operating room and the clinic, and has graduated from medical school, residency, and, in most cases, a fellowship program.

The residents, having graduated from medical school, are also physicians but, being less experienced, are “attendings-in-training,” learning the craft of a specialty via instruction from an attending physician. Residents are classified by the number of years they’ve spent in training, and different specialties will require a shorter or longer residency: there are chief residents (the most experienced residents), fourth-year residents, third-year residents, and so forth. Then there are the interns, physicians who have just finished medical school and are spending their first year out of school rotating through different specialties, learning how to enter orders for medications, writing progress notes on patient care and discharge notes to release patients from the hospital, and responding to immediate issues that arise during the course of the day. To do this an intern must know each patient in order to respond to questions about treatment from the patient and nurses.

Third-year medical students comprise the lowest rung of this ladder. We have little to contribute and plenty to learn. Frequently, we are assigned to follow a few patients and come to know as much as we possibly can about them. Once we know everything about our patients, it will be easier for us to think about what is most important regarding each patient’s care. We learn to pay attention to important details.

This team hierarchy, though it may seem stilted, is actually integral to the process of rounds, where the medical team visits each patient in its care. Rounding provides an opportunity for the healthcare team to speak with patients about how they are doing, to look at and physically examine them. The physical part of the exam is fundamental to healthcare. The abdomen, for example, can feel distended or stiff if there is a certain pathological problem, such as a bowel obstruction. Only by palpating — touching the patient’s body — can we know this. One cannot assess a patient’s progress until one examines a patient.

There are two official times to round during the day. One is immediately upon arrival at the hospital without the attending physician. This involves residents and medical students. And the other is with the attending physician later in the morning. While shuffling between different floors and patients, the hierarchy remains eminently clear. The attending physician leads the charge and behind him or her follows, in order of experience, everyone else: the third-year, the second-year, then the interns, then the medical students. There are usually about eight of us rounding together; to an untrained observer, we might look like the motorcade of a foreign diplomat. We all squeeze into each patient’s hospital room as the attending physician conducts the interview with the patient, assesses the patient, and tells the patient what the team’s plan is over the course of the day: Will a new medication be prescribed? Will the patient finally be able to eat food? Can the patient only drink liquids? As the attending explains this to the patient, one of the interns runs over to the computer inside the patient’s room and enters in the new medication orders or dietary orders. And on to the next patient. Over the course of the day, the new orders are confirmed and reconfirmed with the attending and upper level residents,

This daily pattern of rounding is actually a tradition as old as the American hospital system itself. In earlier days, there was a system of apprenticeship. So, if you wanted to be a physician in late-eighteenth-century America, you would be apprenticed to a doctor who would teach you all that you needed to know. You would then probably be offered a partnership with your teacher. But as the hospital and medical school system took root in the early nineteenth century, students pursued learning opportunities in hospitals in order to receive a more thorough practical education en masse. Individual physicians, after all, had very little time to apprentice aspiring doctors, and frequently the knowledge you received depended solely on one person. In order to teach medicine, hospitals created special programs where students would, as they do today, pay a fee for a basic science education (meaning anatomy, physiology, and pathology) and, eventually, a clinical one as well. Students rounded with residents (also known as house staff) and attendings in order to receive this practical experience in patient care. One description of rounds in Massachusetts General Hospital by Dr. James C. White in the 1850s sounds eerily familiar to me:

[The attending physicians] pass from bed to bed in the large wards, the students following. The house [officer] narrates any incidents in each patient’s condition during the previous twenty-four hours; the physician asks questions, makes the necessary explanations, and directs treatment. Over new and interesting questions much time is spent…. Students have nothing to do with the investigation of cases; they have only to look and listen.

My theory about this process as an educational tool is that it is suited to the role of each member of the team. The upper-level resident should be learning how to dictate orders and take charge of the team because soon he or she will be in that position. The attending, who knows this process well, educates the upper-level resident on whether the plan of care is correct and guides the fourth-year or chief resident. The mid-level resident follows closely on the heels of the upper level because he or she will soon occupy that position. And the interns need to learn how to manage patient care on a detailed level, writing notes and orders to improve at compounding a ton of information into a paragraph or two and assessing doses and units of medications.

And we, the medical students, observe and listen and ask questions when we can. Our purpose is to learn the language by observing patterns in patient care and disease. Thus far, it’s difficult to tell whether this strategy is working; it sometimes feels like I am back in French class on the very first day, listening to a language I’ve never heard before regarding dosages, plans of care, boluses, IV infusion rates, and so forth. But it is also comforting to know that this process has worked for more than a century and a half, and so perhaps we third-year medical students are right where we should be.